Presence in Online Courses

Sean Michael Morris writes about presence and critical pedagogy in this thoughtful piece. How do we create real presence and community in online courses?

Presence, in other words, is not simply showing up to call on raised hands, answer questions, or deliver Powerpoint lectures. Presence is human, all-too human, because education is human, and learning is a problem that humans must solve. And a teacher’s presence must welcome students’ presence so that the community can begin to answer the questions education demands we address.

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Higher Ed & the Digital

In this short piece in Inside Higher Ed, Laura Pasquini writes about academics and their digital persona.

In postsecondary education, it is becoming increasingly vital to share your work and practice online. Open and digital channels help colleagues solicit advice, seek out support/collaboration, offer free professional development, share information and resources, and learn in networked communities with common interests. Besides developing a digital presence, higher education staff, administrators and scholars are utilizing social media and digital technologies to support their work, add to their professional development, engage with peers, learn in the collective and publicly in digital spaces and places.

Writing!

Came across this interesting post by Alex Reid. He writes about recent news articles and statistics about complaints by businesses and professors on poor writing skills of employees and students. I love how the author turns these complaints on their head and suggests that maybe rather than complaining, we do something to help, even so, he points out that complaining will still happen. He writes,

Of course the other way of looking at this is to say that on the whole, college students manage to graduate, get jobs, and keep them (or at least not lose them because they are poor writers). People figure out what they need to figure out. We can undoubtedly help more students be more successful with a better-informed approach to this pedagogical task, but none of that is likely to change the views of professors and corporate officers about their students and employees.